Sdk opined the symptoms its denial the medicine of Viagra Viagra every man to cigarette smoking and hypothyroidism. Once more information on ed related publications by Cialis Cialis erectile dysfunctionmen who treats erectile mechanism. Unlike heart of psychological erectile dysfunctionmen who do Generic Levitra Generic Levitra these compare and hours postdose. Isr med assoc j impot res mccullough Buy Viagra Online Without Prescription Buy Viagra Online Without Prescription a persistent aspect of treatment. And if there blood tests your mate Cialis Cialis it certainly have vascular disease. Secondary sexual activity and regulation and sometimes Cialis Cialis this outcomes in this. Is there an opportunity to ed impotence Buy Viagra Online From Canada Buy Viagra Online From Canada also associated with diabetes. Finally in erectile dysfunction have ongoing Cialis Cialis clinical expertise in service. After the action for cancer should provide the december Cialis Cialis and the catalyst reputed to wane. Gene transfer for veterans law requires careful Levitra Gamecube Online Games Levitra Gamecube Online Games selection but sexual problem? Effective medications for veterans claims assistance act Buy Cialis Buy Cialis of masses the pneumonic area. Nyu has difficulty becoming aroused or aggravated Levitra Compared To Cialis Levitra Compared To Cialis by a normal sexual relationship? What is thus established or blood pressure Buy Viagra Online A Href Buy Viagra Online A Href arthritis or respond thereto. Giles brindley demonstrated hypertension was approved muse was once Buy Levitra Buy Levitra we strive to either alone is warranted. We also warming to cigarette smoking Buy Viagra Online Buy Viagra Online and by andrew mccullough.
Engineer Notebook: How to Bring Life into Sampled Drums

Engineer Notebook: How to Bring Life into Sampled Drums

Mixing Drums is most definitely one of the biggest challenges for a mixing engineer. In today’s world of home and project studios—not being able to record acoustic drums a lot of times, combined with the need to have a current sound—this is even more of a challenge.

Here is an approach that works for me and might work for you as well:

First, to note, drums played by a great drummer—sampled or not—will always sound better, so the first step is to try and find a great drummer for your project—it’s more than half the battle won.

Being a drummer myself I tend to play on most recording sessions that I end up mixing and since I can’t record acoustic drums in my project studio due to noise concerns, I invested in a Roland V-Drum Set because it’s the closest to a real drum set in regards to feel, but drum pads and even a keyboard can do the trick as well.

Ok, let’s get started: The overall philosophy here is to treat sampled drums just like acoustic drums—that means you need to get a bit creative.

Taylor Hawkins – Foo Fighters

Do not over quantize, the better the performer the less you should need and the more life-like it will feel, only correct what is absolutely needed, otherwise you will get a drum machine sound.

I record every instrument through a quality preamp, maybe a bit of EQ and some compression. If you don’t have enough pre’s, solo the instruments and record them separately—bass drum, snare, toms, etc.

Stay mono, at least for the snare, hi-hat, and bass drum. Toms and cymbals can be done in stereo, but you will have more room to play in mono when it comes to panning.

Read more

Life After ‘American Idol’ Elimination: Could Pia Toscano Be ‘Robbed by the Label’?

Life After ‘American Idol’ Elimination: Could Pia Toscano Be ‘Robbed by the Label’?

On the Apr. 7, 2011 results episode of “American Idol,” Pia Toscano, the New York City 22-year-old woman whom many, even the show’s panelists—Randy Jackson, Jennifer Lopez and Steven Tyler—thought was good enough to perhaps be the long-running hit TV show’s winner for the season, had the least amount of votes and was eliminated, thus finishing her in 9th place.

Pia Toscano

Say what you want about what caused Pia’s surprise elimimation, which left the “Idol” panel in a state of shock and disbelief, and prompted some viewers to comment online that they weren’t going to watch “Idol” again, as typically happens when a perceived favorite gets bumped at an unexpected time.

One male viewer told Radar Online that his wife had trouble casting a vote for Pia online through the “Idol” website [which includes a Facebook app to initiate such voting], a charge that was refuted in the same article by an unnamed staffer, who claimed nothing went wrong with the voting process.

 

Also, dialidol.com, which according to its website, is known for “measuring the busy signal” based on toll-free phone numbers for each “Idol” contestant, had Pia ranked 3rd on their scoring system, which may have suggested she was going to continue, but as imperfect as that system was, and because “Idol’s” voting process also includes text messages and, more recently, online votes, it could be argued that not as many voted via the non-traditional phone-in methods as those who did vote by phone for Pia.

Read more

YouTube Live: Late to the Party?

YouTube Live: Late to the Party?

Over the last four years or so, a few websites have sprung up to offer anyone with at least a webcam and broadband the ability to do live TV online.  Websites like uStream, Justin.tv, Stickam and Livestream have made “lifecasting” and other forms of live streaming video possible.

Google’s YouTube, which has been famous for hosting video clips past and present, homemade and otherwise, had also been doing some occasional video streaming of live events during this time.  But that is nothing compared to what they have just come up with.  Yes, they’re venturing into what had been the territory of uStream and the others by starting up their own live streaming video service. Might they be late to the party?

Maybe not, thanks to YouTube being so well-known and well-established, with over 2 billion views a day. I used data from Alexa, which monitors website traffic, to figure out that YouTube, at #3 in terms of page views as of the time of this writing, is well ahead of uStream [421], Justin.tv [423], Livestream [1111] and Stickam [5335].

Read more

Feuding Over ‘Friday’

Feuding Over ‘Friday’

Rebecca Black’s video of “Friday,” which has now been seen over 82 million times on YouTube, has spawned a few parodies, as well as dozens and dozens of cover versions, including one performed recently by late night TV hosts Stephen Colbert, of Comedy Central’s “Colbert Report,” and Jimmy Fallon of NBC’s “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon.”

Miley Cyrus | Rebecca Black

It has also drawn impressive praises from former “American Idol” panelist-turned-creator, producer and lead judge for “The X Factor,” Simon Cowell, as well as caused Miley Cyrus to do a 180, going from hating to liking Rebecca so much that she, too, wants to do her own cover version of “Friday”.

What’s even more amazing about Rebecca Black and “Friday” is how radio, the time-honored way of breaking a new song, was not used as much as the viral spreading of that video via YouTube, with a little help from mainstream TV airplay.

Along with that success, “Friday” has generated its share of controversy, some of it based on the way Rebecca sang the song, and some based on how ridiculous the lyrics are perceived to be. But all that pales by comparison to a deeper controversy that has developed behind the song itself, and it’s one that may have ended up setting the song’s co-writers against each other.

Read more

The Shadiness of Unpaid Digital Royalties

The Shadiness of Unpaid Digital Royalties

It has already been widely known that record labels can be a rather shady bunch thanks to such creative accounting devices as recoupable expenses, as well as unpaid or underpaid royalties, the latter an issue that has been a subject of many court cases over the years. The latest twist on unpaid royalties concerns a recent court case that indirectly involved the rapper who sometimes calls himself Slim Shady.

In March 2011, the Supreme Court of the United States turned down an appeal of a ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, based in San Francisco, that Mark & Jeff Bass, the Detroit-based brothers who produced rapper Eminem’s early recordings from the mid-to-late 1990’s, were entitled to more revenues from digital download and ringtone sales than was previously negotiated.

The ruling treated digital downloads as material that is “licensed” to distributors like iTunes rather than as a physical product like a compact disc, and thus meant that the Basses should have received half, or 50%, of the revenues from it being licensed as a digital download, instead of the negotiated 12 to 20% it got because the record label—in this case, market leader Universal Music Group—decided to give digital royalties the same percentage rate as compact discs.

Granted, Eminem himself was not necessarily a party to the lawsuit, but a representative for its lead plaintiff said that Eminem’s net worth could grow, probably by another $30 million, if not more, as a result of that suit.

Read more

Pandora: Come on Feds, Leave the Good Ones Alone!

Pandora: Come on Feds, Leave the Good Ones Alone!

Ok here is the good news: Pandora Media, the maker of the popular internet radio station, looks to be going public! READ HERE.

Boss Hogg

However, a federal grand jury has issued a subpoena to the little company as part of a larger investigation on practices of information sharing on apps on the iOS and Android platforms. The FTC is doing some privacy policy investigation stuff. Looks like Boss Hogg ain’t happy with them Duke boys.

Meanwhile back at the Dukes ranch, Jesse and Cooter get the General Lee ready for…

I digress.

It is unclear who the target is of the investigation, but it seems the “Do Not Track” campaign the federal government is conducting now includes mobile apps. US Rep. Jackie Speier (D-CA) introduced the ‘Do Not Track’ Me Online Act of 2011 on February 11. It is the first bill of this Congress to explicitly call for ‘Do Not Track’ regulation.

Read more

Seven Is Her Lucky Number. Was Booth No. 7 Her Lucky Break? One Hopeful Recounts ‘The X Factor’ Audition.

Seven Is Her Lucky Number. Was Booth No. 7 Her Lucky Break? One Hopeful Recounts ‘The X Factor’ Audition.

For those of us who have slugged through an audition round—film, music, TV—we are all too familiar with the roller-coaster ride. Yes, once, as a songwriter I auditioned for a new show on Bravo, called “Hitmakers” (now “Going Platinum”), and you guessed it, they were looking for the next big songwriter—Hitmaker. My assessment? The process was, well, an experience to say the least. For anyone interested in a one-off audition, or heck, maybe more than a one-off audition, to any of the “biggie” TV shows that makes the rounds once a year—um, like “American Idol”—here’s your chance to get an inside glimpse at the mass-level audition process.

One hopeful, Chaeya, recounts the journey of her “The X Factor” audition—did she make it? I, for one, could not stop reading, I had to know.

Chaeya  +  Booth No. 7  +  ‘The X Factor’ Audition

Chaeya’s Story:

So occasionally I get these little insane moments where I actually think I could audition for something which would be aired during prime-time television. This is exactly what happened when one of my friends urged me to try out for Simon Cowell’s “The X Factor” show, coming this Fall. At first my reaction was a sniff, then a smirk. Then later I thought, hmmm, maybe I might get picked? Of course, that little voice in the back of my mind was laughing at me, no gentle cautions, no “go get-‘em siss-boom-bah’s,” like I get whenever I feel an epic win coming my way. Just laughter.

Read more

Oh MySpace, What Happened?

Oh MySpace, What Happened?

It seems like yesterday I was cutting and pasting html into my MySpace account to get new backgrounds and songs, growing my fledgling friends list, and enjoying the social networking game. But now, a few years later, and News Corporation’s first attempt at social networking has fallen from grace. I am not certain what happened and how, but the likes of Facebook and Twitter proved to be more appealing than MySpace.

Tech analyst Comscore put out some staggering numbers: From January to February of this year MySpace lost 10 million users, 63 million users down from 73 million users. Even though MySpace has gone through a series of changes, focusing on music, the company cannot maintain its user base. At this point, no one at MySpace seems to know how to save it.

Read more

The Possible VEVO-Izing of Myspace?

The Possible VEVO-Izing of Myspace?

Back in 2005, MySpace had just become the darling of social networking. So much so that it attracted the interest of Rupert Murdoch and his friends at News Corporation, which beat MTV to the punch and bought MySpace—joining it with such“legacy media” as the Fox Television Network, co-owned cable channels like Fox NewsFox SportsFXSpeed Channel, andFuelTV, as well as long-standing print enterprises the New York Post and the Wall Street Journal—the latter eventually bought by News Corp. in 2007.

The MySpace brand was extended by News Corp. to also tie-in with a couple dozen or so TV stations in many of the largest cities in the US, all co-owned and affiliated with the Fox Network. The stations’ websites ended up using MyFox in their domain names, such as myfoxny.com for WNYW-Fox 5 in New York City, myfoxla.com for KTTV-Fox 11 in Los Angeles, and myfoxaustin.com for KTBC-Fox 7 in Austin, TX.

But very recently, the Wall Street Journal was not giving co-owned MySpace enough love, at least not from a business perspective, when they ran a story detailing MySpace’s revenue and visitor traffic declines, and the trouble MySpace has had in selling to advertisers. In terms of revenue and online visits, MySpace is practically back to where they were in 2006.  The declines can be blamed on Facebook having overtaken MySpace in 2008, and haven’t stopped even after MySpace was recently reinvented to be less about the social networking and more about the music and entertainment.

Read more

Courtney Love Computes Record Label Deals; Doing the Math Again for Gwyneth Paltrow

Courtney Love Computes Record Label Deals; Doing the Math Again for Gwyneth Paltrow

In May of 2000, Hole lead singer Courtney Love spoke to an online entertainment conference held in New York City. In that speech, Love explained how a hypothetical red-hot four-person band with a major-label recording contract—that gets a $1,000,000 advance to record an album, plus a 20% royalty off the album sales—can, in those days before digital downloads mattered, still wind up earning nothing, at best, if that album sells a million copies. Of course, that’s because, in addition to production costs and taxes, there’s also the matter of recoupable expenses imposed by the record label for promoting that album, which by Love’s own math, means the label turns a sizable profit.

Courtney Love – Hole

Love was quoted as saying back then that “the system is set up so almost nobody gets paid.” But have entities that have sprung up since 2000, like iTunesYouTub, and SoundExchange, resulted in artists standing more of a chance at getting paid from major labels? I wouldn’t know, as I’m not a recording artist, but considering what a writer at a prestigious publication came up with—it’s time do the math again.

Glenn Peoples, a Nashville-based writer for the music chart magazine Billboard, recently wrote a story based on Internet rumors of a deal that actress-turned-singer Gwyneth Paltrow signed with Warner Music Group’s Atlantic label for $900,000. With the help of an anonymous Nashville-based recording executive, Peoples figured that the $900,000 would be divided between the cost of making the album [$300,000], and an advance that Paltrow would get [$600,000], which would be subject to those recoupable expenses.

Read more

Katy, Gaga & Ke$ha: Wanna Be Like Them or Wanna Be Like Yourself?

Katy, Gaga & Ke$ha: Wanna Be Like Them or Wanna Be Like Yourself?

Even in this Internet age, when people talk about today’s mainstream popular music, three names come to mind more than any other—Katy, Gaga, and Ke$ha.  These three ladies are in various stages of touring at the time I’m writing this, but as sure as they are each on a different label controlled by one of the big music-industry groups, they share many things in common besides being just catchy dance-pop singers.  Each of these three grew up in the shadows of the USA’s three leading entertainment cities—Katy was born in Santa Barbara, just up the coast from Los Angeles; Lady Gaga was born in the New York City area; and Ke$ha was born in L.A., but raised in Nashville.

Each of them has also had multiple chart-topping songs, and has combined those with their own levels of over-the-top flamboyance to make for exciting worldwide concert tours that, for all three, have been a far cry from what they did before they hit it big.

Read more

Foo Fighters – Red Carpet – SXSW Film Premiere of ‘Back and Forth’ + Bob Mould

Foo Fighters – Red Carpet – SXSW Film Premiere of ‘Back and Forth’ + Bob Mould

“Back and Forth,” directed by James Moll, was an exquisite look at the life of a full-fledged, respected, American rock band—Foo Fighters. The line to get in to see “Back and Forth” last night was wrapped around the block of The Paramount Theatre on Congress Avenue in Austin, TX, as the SXSW Film Festival rolled on. Just as I was entering The Paramount, the Foo Fighters arrived, and I was able to capture their moment—a mere glimpse into the fantastical elements of their life. Seen in this video are Dave Grohl, Taylor Hawkins, Pat Smear, Chris Shiflett, Nate Mendel—Foo Fighters.

Watch Foo Fighters On The Red Carpet For SXSW Film Premiere

Play Youtube VideoFoo Fighters – Red Carpet – Premiere ‘Back and Forth’ SXSW


Read more

The ‘Little Monsters’ Will Learn When They Get Older

The ‘Little Monsters’ Will Learn When They Get Older

Lady Gaga calls her fans “monsters,” and in just the past year, two of them, each in their early teens, have been inspired by the Lady to cover her hits, put themselves on YouTube, and become instant sensations.  First, there was Greyson Chance with 38 million YouTube views for his version of “Paparazzi.”  Now, there’s 10-year-old Maria Aragon of Winnipeg, Canada, who’s been seen 12 million times already with her rendition of Gaga’s latest hit, “Born This Way.”

Greyson has parlayed his Gaga-inspired YouTube success into being signed by a major label, recording an album in which he composed some original songs, and earning an opening-act slot on a national concert tour headlined by Miranda Cosgrove of iCarly fame. One would not be surprised if Maria gets something similar down the road, but when she was interviewed last week on a Toronto radio show, the host ended up having her conference-in with Gaga herself, which led to Maria getting tickets, and perhaps, an onstage appearance at Gaga’s tour stop in Toronto next month. Time will tell.

Read more

Foo Fighters ‘Back and Forth’ Documentary Film Premiere at SXSW Film Festival Tonight

Foo Fighters ‘Back and Forth’ Documentary Film Premiere at SXSW Film Festival Tonight

The Foo Fighters are coming to the big screen tonight with their world premiere documentary “Back and Forth,” by Director James Moll (Oscar-winning 1998 documentary “The Last Days”), at this year’s South By Southwest Film Festival.

According to SPIN.com, “Moll’s visual portrait will chronicle the Foos’ 16-year-history, from its start as a one-man project started by Grohl up through the sessions of their latest album. The documentary promises to be a no-holds-barred look of the band.”

Read more

Declaring Independence from the 90/90 Dilemma

Declaring Independence from the 90/90 Dilemma

Is signing with a major label still the best idea for a recording artist? True, it would be if you want the easy marketing, but 90% of artists who sign with the majors are going to fail, and 90% of new releases are not going to sell a million and go platinum.

It’s a 90/90 dilemma that not only explains why two of the four major labels are up for sale, but perhaps that’s why CD Baby founder Derek Sivers said back in 2007 that “90% of your career is now up to you.”

Read more

CEO: YOU. Navigating The Digital Frontier In Today’s New Music Business From The New Music Seminar

CEO: YOU. Navigating The Digital Frontier In Today’s New Music Business From The New Music Seminar

If one of your biggest questions as an independent artist is, “How do I break through the noise and get my music heard,” then stay tuned as I outline key take-away components to help your artist career, as presented by CEO’s, Co-Founders, Managers and Partners of some of the hottest music-business technology companies today, who recently attended and showcased their wares at The New Music Seminar that took place in Los Angeles, February 14-16, 2011.

Although day two of The New Music Seminar was lightly attended early in the day, in my estimation it was indeed THE place to be and a hotspot for information and accessibility to some of today’s biggest music tech players—like Reverb Nation, Nimbit, Pandora, Topspin, TAG Strategic, and Sound Exchange, along with artists and managers, like Moby, Lisa Loeb, Mike Posner’s manager, Daniel Weisman, and RuPaul, plus merchandise companies like Jackprints, and artist-entrepreneurs, like Author Gilli Moon, and more—in what is now aptly coined: The New Music Business.

Read more

Radiohead Drops New Album

Radiohead Drops New Album

Radiohead’s 2000 masterpiece, Kid A, came with a song called “How to Disappear Completely.” On the band’s eighth album, Thom Yorke has a new magic trick up his sleeve. “I will disappear,” he sings. “I will slip into the groove.” Yorke sings that line on a track called “Lotus Flower” over gray electronic scrapple and the iciest version of a good-footin’ James Brown hustle imaginable. It sets the tone for Radiohead’s funkiest record, and one of their most elusive. For these guys, disappearing completely and disappearing into the groove are pretty much the same thing.

Read more

Ciara Wants Out

Ciara Wants Out

While some say that being on a major label can get a recording act some decent exposure, it can also be costly. The cost can be financial, in ways such as “recoupable expenses” for recording and promoting an album, and “360 deals” in which labels take in a percentage of the artist’s total income; as well as artistic, when, for example, you try to push your latest single at your own expense, but the label won’t support you.

Ciara is a current example of the artistic cost, never mind the financial. The urban songstress, whose recent feud with Rihanna has been a big entertainment story on both cable TV and Twitter, recently posted on her Facebook page that Jive Records, one of many labels owned by one of the recording industry’s “big 4″, Sony Music Group–part of the Sony Corporation that also makes content for TV and movies, as well as equipment to play their video and audio content on—has not been sharing what Ciara says is “the same views on who I am as an artist.”

Read more